2020-2021 College Catalog 
    
    Jan 20, 2021  
2020-2021 College Catalog

Course Descriptions


Basic Skill Prerequisites

E = English Composition
M = Mathematics
R = Reading

 

Accounting

  
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    ACCT 100 - Practical Accounting


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    A course for non-accounting majors to familiarize students with small business accounting or for students desiring a practical knowledge of principles before ACCT 101 . The course covers the complete accounting cycle of both mercantile and personal services enterprises. It is designed to provide a better understanding of business procedures and the accounting phase of business. This course is used as a requirement or elective depending on degree requirements.
  
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    ACCT 101 - Accounting Principles I


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    This course introduces concepts and techniques basic to the solution of record keeping problems of a business enterprise. It deals with the methods of recording, reporting, and interpreting the financial data of the business unit. Topics include adjusting entries, closing entries, cash control, receivables, inventory, fixed assets and current liabilities. Prerequisite: R, M.
  
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    ACCT 102 - Accounting Principles II


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    This course covers accounting for corporations, investments and cash flows. In addition, the students are introduced to managerial accounting concepts. Topics include standard costs, job and process costing, budgeting and financial statement analysis. Prerequisite: “C” or better in ACCT 101 .
  
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    ACCT 105 - Accounting with Computers


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    A course designed to teach students how to perform the accounting cycle with QuickBooksPro software. This course covers the complete accounting cycle and includes computerization of accounts receivable, accounts payable, and payroll. Prerequisite: ACCT 101 .
  
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    ACCT 110 - Payroll Accounting


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    Payroll Accounting provides an in-depth study of payroll procedures. Included are a discussion of employees and independent contractors, how to calculate gross wages for hourly and salaried employees, mandatory and voluntary withholdings, employer taxes, record payroll, and state and federal record keeping requirements. Current tax rates and current tax forms will be used. Completion of a payroll practice set is required. Prerequisite: ACCT 100  or ACCT 101 .
  
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    ACCT 210 - Intermediate Accounting I


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    This course covers the accounting process and basic concepts and principles, the definition and measurement of assets, measuring revenue expense and period-end adjustments in determining net income. Course objectives: to provide students with the knowledge of the intricate treatment of assets in an accounting system, to enable students to analyze accounting statements, and to provide students with the capability of dealing with the detailed and varied accounting procedures that pertain to assets and their adjustments. Prerequisite: “C” or better in ACCT 102 .
  
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    ACCT 211 - Intermediate Accounting II


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    This course covers the definition and measurement of liabilities and capital, financial statement analysis, treatment of accounting errors. Course objectives: to provide students with the knowledge of the intricate treatment of liabilities and capital accounts in the accounting system, to provide students with the capability of dealing with the detailed and varied accounting procedures as they pertain to liabilities and capital accounts. Prerequisite: “C” or better in ACCT 102 .
  
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    ACCT 215 - Cost Accounting I


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    This course covers the objectives, systems, and techniques of cost accounting, the process, job order, and standard cost system, managerial use of cost information for profit planning, control, and decision-making. Course objectives: to familiarize the student with cost accounting objectives and systems, to provide the student with the capability of working with process costs, job order costs, and standard cost processes, to develop a knowledge of how to budget and plan utilizing cost accounting data. Prerequisite: ACCT 102 .
  
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    ACCT 216 - Taxation I


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    A course covering an overview of federal and state personal income tax. An introduction to corporate and business taxes, including sales and use taxes, as well as payroll tax forms and regulations.
  
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    ACCT 272 - Accounting Co-op


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    Students who have substantially completed the requirements for the two-year associate degree in accounting are provided with an opportunity to earn credit by working in an approved accounting job situation. Co-op education means working for pay under the guidelines of the co-op education program at Bay College. Some internships (non-pay) positions may occasionally be available. Prerequisites: ACCT 210 , 2.75 GPA in Accounting, and approval of division chairperson. Co-ops may require that the student pass a criminal background check.

Anthropology

  
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    ANTH 201 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course will present a broad understanding of the field of cultural anthropology that includes world cultures, ethnicity and race, language, political systems, gender, marriage, religion, art, and an appreciation of the breadth and complexity of the human condition. Also included will be research ethics and methods. Meets Humanities and Social & Behavioral Science requirement. Prerequisite: R.
  
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    ANTH 201H - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology-Honors


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course will present a broad understanding of the field of cultural anthropology that includes world cultures, ethnicity and race, language, political systems, gender, marriage, religion, art, and an appreciation of the breadth and complexity of the human condition. Also included will be research ethics and methods. Meets Humanities and Social & Behavioral Science requirement. This is an Honors course which requires additional work and academic rigor. Prerequisite: R and acceptance into the Honors Program.

Automotive Technology

  
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    AUTO 100 - Automotive Engines


    Credit(s): 5
    Contact Hours: 8

    The objective of this course is to provide the theoretical background necessary to understand the operation of the internal combustion engine. Students will have the opportunity to use the special tools and equipment necessary for servicing engines.
  
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    AUTO 110 - Automotive Brakes


    Credit(s): 5
    Contact Hours: 8

    This course is designed to present to the student the basic theory of operation of automotive brake systems. The course will include how to use electronic service information, suggested manufacturer service procedures, and the proper use of special tools to service present automotive brake systems. Corequisite: AUTO 120 .
  
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    AUTO 120 - Automotive Electrical I


    Credit(s): 5
    Contact Hours: 8

    This course is designed as an overview of automotive electrical/electronic systems. Instruction and lab activities will build from basic electrical principles through microprocessor controls. The use of a variety of electrical measurement, diagnostic equipment, and wiring diagrams are an essential part of this course.
  
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    AUTO 130 - Automotive Standard Transmissions & Power Trains


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 6

    The primary objective of this course is intended to provide the student with a fundamental understanding of the automotive power train. Students will use reference manuals, hand tools, and specific equipment in working with transaxles, transmissions, universal joints, CV joints, and differentials.
  
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    AUTO 140 - Automotive Engine Performance I


    Credit(s): 5
    Contact Hours: 8

    The objective of this course is to provide the student with a basic understanding of the theory and operation of ignition and fuel systems. Emphasis is placed on the study of specific functions in structure and servicing of modern ignition and fuel systems. Corequisite: AUTO 120 .
  
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    AUTO 150 - Automotive Suspension & Steering


    Credit(s): 5
    Contact Hours: 8

    Using special tools and equipment, this course presents the basic theory of operation, servicing automotive suspension and steering, and four- wheel alignment.
  
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    AUTO 200 - Automotive Engine Performance II


    Credit(s): 5
    Contact Hours: 8

    This course is a continuation of AUTO 140 . It is an introduction to information and diagnosis of engine emissions and performance conditions related to basic mechanical, fuel injection, engine management, and ignition systems. The course includes theory of system operation with an emphasis on systematic troubleshooting. There will be hands-on exercises and special tool usage, including scan tools, dvom, inductive ammeter, exhaust gas analyzer, engine/ignition secondary analyzer and signal scopes. Prerequisite: AUTO 120  & AUTO 140 .
  
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    AUTO 220 - Automotive Electrical II


    Credit(s): 5
    Contact Hours: 8

    An in-depth study of the operation, diagnosis, and repair of automotive body and chassis electrical/electronic systems. Includes the study of lighting, wiper-washer, power window/seat/door locks, instrumentation, inflatable restraints, cruise control, anti-theft, suspension/steering, and audio systems. Course content will also include a study of the operation, testing, diagnosis and service of automotive battery, charging, and cranking systems. Prerequisite: AUTO 120 .
  
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    AUTO 230 - Automatic Transmissions


    Credit(s): 5
    Contact Hours: 8

    This course is designed to present to the student the basic theory of operation of automatic transmissions. Through the use of training transmissions, the student will disassemble, inspect, measure, test, adjust, and reassemble these training transmissions according to the manufacturer specifications. Prerequisite: AUTO 130 .
  
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    AUTO 270 - Automotive HVAC Systems


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 4

    Automotive Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning. In-depth study of automotive heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems. The course includes theory of operation, diagnosis, and repair of HVAC systems. Environmental safety issues are stressed including laws and regulations, CFC recovery and recycling, ozone depletion, and new, environmentally safe systems. Computerized automatic temperature controlled systems are also covered. Prerequisite: AUTO 120 .
  
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    AUTO 272 - Automotive Service Co-op


    Credit(s): 6
    Contact Hours: 6

    This cooperative work experience is designed to provide the student with on-the-job training opportunities. Prerequisites: Completion of two semesters of the Automotive Technology Program, a valid drivers license, and instructor recommendation. Co-ops may require that the student pass a criminal background check.

Biology

  
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    BIOL 090 - Fundamentals of Biology


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    Developmental in nature, this course is designed to familiarize those students who have weak backgrounds in high school science with the world of science in general and human biology in particular. Being developmental, this course does not fulfill requirements toward any degree.
  
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    BIOL 103 - Essential Biology


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 5

    This course is a single semester survey of the most important biological concepts and issues relevant to life on earth including evolution, genetics, and ecology. It is designed to fulfill general education requirements for non-science, liberal arts majors. If you plan to transfer to a four year institution and major in engineering, social science, computer science, or any basic or applied physical or life science, you should take BIOL 110  and BIOL 112  instead of this course. (Note: There are no dissections in lab). Prerequisite: E, R. Students will benefit from having had a least one year of natural science in high school or BIOL 090 .
  
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    BIOL 104 - Human Biology


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 5

    This course emphasizes human structure and function at the chemical, cellular, tissue, organ, organ system, and organismal levels. It is designed primarily for the social scientist and to fulfill general education requirements for non-science, liberal arts majors. It typically does not transfer for credit as part of a biology major. (Note: Dissections are a required part of lab. Students will benefit from having had at least one year of natural science in high school or BIOL 090 ). Prerequisites: E, R.
  
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    BIOL 107 - Environmental Science


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course provides a broad introduction to natural systems, ecological concepts, and the social and cultural institutions that affect human interactions with the natural world. It presents an interdisciplinary perspective on current environmental issues while developing analytical and problem solving skills. To meet natural science lab requirements for A.A. or A.S. degrees, and for many transfer programs. Prerequisite: E, R. Students will benefit from having had at least one year of natural science in high school or BIOL 090 . BIOL-107 should be taken concurrently with BIOL 108 - Environmental Science Lab .
  
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    BIOL 108 - Environmental Science Lab


    Credit(s): 1
    Contact Hours: 2

    This course provides lab experiences associated with BIOL 107 . When possible, BIOL-108 should be taken concurrently with BIOL 107 .
  
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    BIOL 110 - Evolution & Diversity


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 6

    This course surveys the diversity of life with an emphasis on evolutionary theory, ecology, patterns of inheritance, and population genetics. It is intended for all students with a strong interest in the life sciences. It is recommended for students planning to transfer to a four year institution and major or minor in a life science, engineering, social science, computer science, or any physical science. Prerequisite: E, M, R. Students will benefit from having had at least two years of natural science in high school (including biology and chemistry). This course and its companion, BIOL 112 , can be taken in any order. It is recommended that students have a minimum ACT science score of 20.
  
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    BIOL 112 - Cells & Molecules


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 6

    This course focuses on the structural, physiological, and genetic characteristics of cells. Topics covered include the chemistry of life, cell structure and function, cell physiology, respiration, photosynthesis, molecular genetics, and biotechnology. It is intended for all students with a strong interest in the life sciences. It is recommended for students planning to transfer to a four year institution and major or minor in a life science, engineering, social science, computer science, or any physical science. Prerequisite: E, R, CHEM 110 . Students will benefit from having had at least two years of natural science in high school, including biology and chemistry. This course and its companion BIOL 110  can be taken in any order. It is recommended that students have a minimum ACT science score of 20.
  
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    BIOL 202 - Plants & Animals


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 6

    This course emphasizes a comparative study of plant and animal anatomy and physiology. Plant topics covered will include structure, growth, transport, nutrition, reproduction, and development. Animal topics covered will include behavior, anatomy, nutrition, circulation, defense, regulation, signaling, reproduction, development, nervous system, sensory and motor mechanisms. Prerequisites: BIOL 103 , or BIOL 110  and BIOL 112 , or permission of the instructor.
  
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    BIOL 213 - Anatomy & Physiology I


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 5

    A study of the structure and function of the human body. This is an in-depth course for science and life science majors. It covers cells, tissues, nervous, sensory, circulatory, lymphatic, and respiratory systems. It will include extensive dissection and written laboratory reporting. Prerequisites: R, ACT Science score minimum of 20 (24 is recommended) or the student must have passed with a “C” or better one year of high school biology or BIOL 104 , and must have passed with a “C” or better one year of high school chemistry or CHEM 102  and CHEM 104 .
  
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    BIOL 214 - Anatomy & Physiology II


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 5

    A continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. It will cover the digestive, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, endocrine, and reproductive systems; plus fluids, metabolism, and developmental subjects. Prerequisites: “C” or better in BIOL 213 .
  
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    BIOL 225 - Medical Microbiology


    Credit(s): 2
    Contact Hours: 2

    An introductory Microbiology course emphasizing the medical applications of microbiology. The subject matter will include microscopic techniques, prokaryotic and eukaryotic structure, control of growth, diversity of microbial life, epidemiology, the immune system, and common microbial diseases. Prerequisites: CHEM 102  and CHEM 104  or equivalent, and at least one semester of college level Biology.
  
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    BIOL 226 - Microbiology


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 6

    An introductory course designed to give the student an understanding of the means by which microorganisms’ growth can be controlled and regulated, their symbiotic relationships, and host responses to their presence. Prerequisite: 8 credits of Biology or permission of instructor. Exposure to biochemical principles is recommended.
  
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    BIOL 231 - Biotechnology Lab I


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 4

    This course introduces the basics of Biotechnology with emphasis placed on laboratory experience. Topics include lab safety, developing and maintaining a scientific notebook, culturing microbes, basic lab skills, reagent preparation, DNA isolation and analysis, PCR reactions, protein isolation and analysis, enzyme function, agarose and PAGE gel electrophoresis. The students will be expected to adopt the strategies and methods used to develop experiments, analyze collected data, and apply the results. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on laboratory safety techniques. Prerequisite: ACT Science Score minimum of 20, but 24 is recommended. Corequisite: CHEM-107 or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 232 - Biotechnology Lab II


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 4

    This course is a continuation of BIOL-231. Topics to be covered will include carbohydrate isolation and analysis, Spectrophotometry, Chromatography, pH and buffers, recombinant DNA and transformation, and cell culturing. The students will be expected to adopt the strategies and methods used to develop experiments, analyze collected data, and apply the results. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on laboratory safety techniques. Prerequisites: “C” or better in BIOL 231  .
  
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    BIOL 255 - Genetics


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course emphasizes the development of analytical and problem solving skills in molecular, transmission, and population genetics. To meet natural science breadth requirements for A.A. or A.S. degrees, and for many transfer programs. BIOL-255 must be taken concurrently with BIOL 256 - Genetics Lab . Prerequisite: BIOL 103 , or BIOL 110  & BIOL 112 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 256 - Genetics Lab


    Credit(s): 1
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course provides lab experiences associated with BIOL 255 . BIOL-256 should be taken concurrently with BIOL 255 .
  
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    BIOL 270 - Ecology


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course emphasizes the study of the interactions between organisms and their environment from an evolutionary perspective. Ecological concepts relating to the individual, population, community, and ecosystem levels of biological organization are emphasized. To meet the natural science breadth requirements for A.A. or A.S. degrees, and for many transfer programs, BIOL-270 must be taken concurrently with BIOL 271 - Ecology Lab . Prerequisite: BIOL 103 , or BIOL 110  & BIOL 112 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 271 - Ecology Lab


    Credit(s): 1
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course provides lab experiences associated with BIOL 270 . BIOL-271 should be taken concurrently with BIOL 270 .
  
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    BIOL 272 - Life Science Internship


    Credit(s): 1
    Contact Hours: 1

    This course provides an option for general biology, natural resources, health sciences, and biotechnology majors to obtain valuable worksite experience.
  
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    BIOL 276 - Pathophysiology


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    The purpose of this course is to define and analyze significant pathophysiological processes of common diseases and illnesses utilizing a systematic approach. The etiology, pathogenesis, and clinical manifestations of common disease processes are covered. Prerequisite: BIOL 214 .

Brewing

  
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    BREW 101 - Brewing Science


    Credit(s): 2
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course is intended for those who are interested in obtaining a well-rounded introduction to the practice of brewing. The curriculum has been designed with direct input and participation by local brewing professionals. The course introduces the science behind brewing, provides deeper understanding of the different craft brew styles, and allows students to practice their skills by making a batch under the guidance of a brewing expert. Successful completers will be prepared to pursue employment in a wide variety of positions in a craft beverage operation.

Business

  
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    BUSN 105 - Professional Workplace Skills


    Credit(s): 2
    Contact Hours: 2

    Workplace skill sets, such as, attitude, written and oral communication, and human relations are the keys to excelling in any industry and in any workplace environment. This course will provide students with real hands-on career building skill set development opportunities in the areas of improving both personal and professional development. Topics include: goal setting strategies; proper etiquette and ethical behavior in the workplace; time management techniques; stress management solutions; incorporating diversity in the workplace; development of effective communication; enhancing teambuilding skill development; developing a professional image, and development of a can-do attitude.
  
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    BUSN 160 - Introduction to Business


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course is intended to offer the student an overview of the business complex, business organization and management, personnel and labor relations, banking and finance, governmental agencies and controls, production, marketing, and the like. Throughout the course, current career opportunities will be explored.
  
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    BUSN 177 - Mathematics of Business


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    A course intended primarily for non-transfer business students and for others who need to use mathematics in the solution of practical problems. Some of the areas covered include banking procedures, payroll, financial situations, time value of money, installment buying, cost of home ownership, stocks and bonds, business statistics, frequency distributions, and measures of dispersion. This course does not fulfill the math requirements for the A.S. or A.A. degrees. This course is a supportive course designed to meet occupational program requirements. Prerequisite: “C” or better in MATH 095 , or MATH 097 , or MATH 098 , or appropriate score on the mathematics placement test.
  
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    BUSN 195 - Business Communications


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course is designed to help the student develop communications skills appropriate to a variety of business situations including letters, memos, short reports, electronic slide presentations, e-mail, group interaction, and listening skills. Emphasis will be placed on both content and mechanics with a goal of mailability on all written documents. Prerequisite: E, R, and CIS 101 , or permission of instructor. Keyboarding ability is recommended.
  
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    BUSN 203 - Management Information Systems


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    A study of the roles, value, and design of management information systems in various business contexts. Includes information about the IT infrastructure comprising these systems (e.g. databases, networks, hardware and software technology), as well as key applications of these systems (e.g. decision making, e-commerce, information/knowledge management). Students will learn about the systems development process while gaining hands-on experience with management information system components and working in teams to perform selected activities. Prerequisite: CIS 101  or instructor permission.
  
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    BUSN 242 - Principles of Management


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    An introduction into the social and legal implications of business functions and managerial decision-making problems and solutions. The student, upon completion, should be able to use the knowledge in making better personal and social decisions in business. Prerequisite: BUSN 160 .
  
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    BUSN 250 - Business Law I


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    A course dealing with common law and the Uniform Commercial Code as it applies to contracts, agencies, employment, commercial paper, personal property, and bailments. The introduction to the course surveys the law and the resolution of disputes. The introduction also includes the social forces and legal rights included in the law.
  
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    BUSN 251 - Business Law II


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    A course in business law to be used as an elective in the accounting and general business programs. The material to be covered will include business law as it pertains to agency, employment, partnerships, corporations, and commercial paper.
  
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    BUSN 253 - Marketing


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This is an introductory course in marketing. It is designed to look at the major elements used to successfully market products, services, and ideas. The course covers the marketing process from evaluation of the marketing environment through development of a marketing plan. Students will utilize the marketing concepts to analyze situations, develop creative problem solutions, and present workable alternatives. The role of marketing in the business structure and the use of a marketing philosophy in business are examined.
  
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    BUSN 258 - Small Business Management


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course is designed to cover the areas of small business and management. The emphasis of the course is on selection, start-up, and operation of a small business. Students develop a comprehensive business plan for opening a new business or purchasing an existing business. Areas of concentration include the decision to choose self-employment, factors necessary for personal success in a small business, evaluating the potential for business success, options for establishing a small business, organization, financing site selection, layout, operations, and control. Prerequisite: BUSN 160 .
  
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    BUSN 260 - International Business


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course is intended to offer the student an overview and comparison of international business environments. It is designed to provide the student with the basic concepts and theories pertaining to global business. Course content includes, but is not limited to, the social, political, and economic environments of the multinational firm. Prerequisite: BUSN 160 .
  
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    BUSN 261 - Advertising and Promotion


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course focuses on the fundamentals of advertising and promotion through the expansion of marketing strategies resulting in the development of a comprehensive multimedia advertising campaign. Elements covered include market research, media selection and planning, and application of creative strategies for evaluation and develop of advertisement and promotion. Prerequisites: BUSN 160  and BUSN 253 .
  
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    BUSN 262 - Principles of Selling


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course covers developing sales techniques effective in various types of professional selling situations. Basic principles of selling are emphasized, and the students shall be able to relate these sales techniques to the individual’s area of concentration.
  
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    BUSN 263 - Introduction to Modern Advertising


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This is an introductory course in Advertising and Integrated Brand Promotion. The course will cover area relevant to modern advertising, offering a comprehensive overview of advertising and brand promotion from an integrated marketing communications perspective. The course covers the historical, economic, social, legal and ethical aspects of advertising along with the roles of tradtional advertising as well as digital and interactive media. Students will use the elements of market research, media planning, and creative strategies to evaluate and create advertisements and comprehensive advertising campaigns. Prerequisites: BUSN 160  and BUSN 253 .
  
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    BUSN 264 - Social Media Marketing


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course focuses on the creation and implementation of a social media marketing campaign and evaluation of its success. Students will learn best practices to develop the skills needed to connect business objectives with social media strategy, platforms, and tactics. Emphasis is placed on evaluating, creating, and integrating social media tools to meet marketing objectives to improve business. This course is intended for various backgrounds, however, a basic understanding of marketing along with common social media platforms and supported technologies is recommended.
  
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    BUSN 272 - Internship & Cooperative Education


    Credit(s): 1-4
    Contact Hours: 1-4

    Students who have acquired the fundamental skill sets of their business education are given an opportunity to put their knowledge, skills, and abilities into practice through this Internship/Co-operative Education course. The student may earn business elective credit by working in a for-profit or non-profit setting. Internship means work for credit only, while co-operative education means work for pay under the guidelines of co-operative education at Bay College. Prerequisite: 24 semester hours of course work in related field, cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher. Must meet with an advisor prior to registration. Internships & Co-ops may require that the student pass a criminal background check.

Certified Medical Assistant Certificate

  
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    CMAC 100 - Clinical Law and Ethics


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course focuses on the scope of practice for the Certified Medical Assistant, the Health Information Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), patient rights, criminal and civil law, interviewing, compliance reporting, public health statutes, legal terms, ethics, morals and practices for emergency situations. To progress in the program, the student must maintain a grade of C or better in Certified Medical Assistant program courses and demonstrate a minimum of 100% attainment of all psychomotor and affective domain competencies. Officially accepted into the Certified Medical Assistant Certificate program and following the required sequence of courses, E and R.
  
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    CMAC 102 - Clinical Safety and Infection Control


    Credit(s): 2
    Contact Hours: 6

    This course is a combined lecture/lab course which focuses on protective practices in the medical office and outpatient environments. Topics include maintaining safety of the environment, emergency management, biological, radioactive, and chemical exposures and identification of strategies to ensure risk mitigation and appropriate management of same. Infection control techniques are also covered and include use of correct techniques in setting up a sterile field, principles of asepsis and autoclaving practices, performing wound care, and ensuring appropriate use of standard precautions. Officially accepted into the Certified Medical Assistant Certificate program and following the required sequence of courses. To progress in the program, the student must maintain a grade of C or better in Certified Medical Assistant program courses and demonstrate a minimum of 100% attainment of all psychomotor and affective domain competencies.
  
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    CMAC 104 - Clinical Communication


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course focuses on fundamental skills needed to effectively communicate with patients, families, clients, providers, vendors, and supervisory personnel in the outpatient clinical setting. Different types of communication, including: verbal, non-verbal, written, and electronic communication; as well as, barriers to communication are explored. Emphasis is placed on specific developmental and behavioral theory, including: Maslow, Erikson and Kubler-Ross, as a framework for effective communication in the clinical setting. Students will develop an understanding of the role of coping mechanisms, diversity, and coaching in clinical communication to ensure patient health care needs are met and to assist them in effectively navigating the medical office and outpatient clinical care setting with effective communication. Officially accepted into the Certified Medical Assistant Certificate program and following the required sequence of courses, E and R. To progress in the program, the student must maintain a grade of C or better in Certified Medical Assistant program courses and demonstrate a minimum of 100% attainment of all psychomotor and affective domain competencies.
  
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    CMAC 106 - Clinical Office Practice and Procedures


    Credit(s): 2
    Contact Hours: 6

    This is a lab course which explores the clinical functions of the medical assistant and is designed to prepare students for the externship in the clinical/outpatient medical environment. Prior content will be reinforced such as clinical safety, First Aid BLS, and infection control, etc. Additionally, concurrent content in didactic courses will be reinforced, such as safe administration of medication. New skills and concepts used in obtaining physiological data and performing tasks in the clinical and outpatient setting will be gained, including: electrocardiography, assisting with minor surgery, and a variety of ambulatory and outpatient clinical treatments. Officially accepted into the Certified Medical Assistant Certificate program and following the required sequence of courses, E, M, and R. To progress in the program, the student must maintain a grade of C or better in Certified Medical Assistant program courses and demonstrate a minimum of 100% attainment of all psychomotor and affective domain competencies.
  
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    CMAC 108 - Human Body and Disease


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course will introduce students to basic systems-based anatomy, physiology, and common pathology as it relates to the role of the Medical Assistant in the ambulatory and outpatient clinic environment in providing patient care. Specific diagnostic measures, and treatment modalities will be incorporated into learning activities based on body systems covered. Topics will include basic review of cells, tissues, organs, and the various body systems including: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, endocrine, nervous system, cardiology, circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Officially accepted into the Certified Medical Assistant Certificate program and following the required sequence of courses, E, M and R. To progress in the program, the student must maintain a grade of C or better in Certified Medical Assistant program courses and demonstrate a minimum of 100% attainment of all psychomotor and affective domain competencies.
  
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    CMAC 110 - Clinical Medication Administration


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course is designed to provide the medical assistant with a working knowledge of practical pharmacology and medication administration in the clinical office and outpatient settings. Drugs are explained through their effects on the body’s anatomical structures and systems. Topics include drug names, laws, development, categories, sources, forms, resources, classification of drugs, immunizations, abuse, and misuse of substances. Students will also learn principles of dosage calculation and conversions among various measure systems and gain an understanding of the National Patient Safety goals and standards related to safe medication administration, including various methods of delivery excluding intravenous. Officially accepted into the Certified Medical Assistant Certificate program and following the required sequence of courses, E, M and R. To progress in the program, the student must maintain a grade of C or better in Certified Medical Assistant program courses and demonstrate a minimum of 100% attainment of all psychomotor and affective domain competencies.
  
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    CMAC 112 - Clinical Nutrition


    Credit(s): 2
    Contact Hours: 2

    This course will provide students the fundamental knowledge and skills needed to identify proper nutrition and instruct patients according to their dietary needs. Students will gain an understanding of dietary nutrients, supplements, dietary needs, and medical diet programs (i.e., Dash and ADA diets). Officially accepted into the Certified Medical Assistant Certificate program and following the required sequence of courses, E, M and R. To progress in the program, the student must maintain a grade of C or better in Certified Medical Assistant program courses and demonstrate a minimum of 100% attainment of all psychomotor and affective domain competencies.
  
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    CMAC 204 - Medical Assistant Review and Practical


    Credit(s): 2
    Contact Hours: 4

    This course is designed to serve as the capstone course for the Certified Medical Assistant program. This course contains a lab component and is focused on evaluating students, achievement of end of program student learning outcomes and preparing students to successfully challenge the Medical Assistant Certification Examination. The MAERB Core curriculum and the Master Competency list will be utilized to evaluate students’ level of preparedness for the exam and validate attainment of end of program student learning outcomes. This is a “Pass/Fail” course. Officially accepted into the Certified Medical Assistant Certificate program and following the required sequence of courses. To successfully complete the program, the student must maintain a grade of C or better in all Certified Medical Assistant program courses and demonstrate a minimum of 100% attainment of all psychomotor and affective domain competencies.
  
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    CMAC 272 - Medical Assistant Externship


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    This course provides students with a supervised clinical experience in an affiliated medical office facility or qualifying outpatient setting to give students practical skills. This unpaid clinical practicum will be at various medical offices and hours and shifts are set by the facility. A minimum of 160 hours is required. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. Students are required to pass this course to graduate from the program. To graduate from the program, students must maintain a grade of C or better in Certified Medical Assistant program courses and demonstrate a minimum of 100% attainment of all psychomotor and affective domain competencies. Officially accepted into the Certified Medical Assistant Certificate program and following the required sequence of courses, E, M, and R. Must have clinical clearance from Allied Health demonstrating student meets criteria for same as indicated in the Student Handbook prior to participation in any externship hours.

Chemistry

  
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    CHEM 090 - Fundamentals of Chemistry


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    Developmental in nature, this course is designed to familiarize those students who have a weak background in high school chemistry. This course does not fulfill requirements toward any degree. Prerequisite: “C” grade or better in MATH 095 , MATH 098 , or MATH 106 , or an appropriate score on the mathematics placement exam. An appropriate scientific calculator is required.
  
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    CHEM 102 - Introduction to Chemistry


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    A survey of the basic concepts and principles of chemistry designed for non-science majors. An introduction to the basic language of chemistry, the basic systems of inorganic, organic, and biochemistry, and their application to everyday life and the general ecosystem. Topics may include the chemistry of drugs, household products, energy resources, air resources, and material resources. This course is designed for students who are not majoring in chemistry as well as for those fulfilling a lab science requirement in their degree if taken with CHEM 104 . One semester of high school science expected. Prerequisites: E, M, R.
  
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    CHEM 103 - Essential Chemistry


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 5

    A survey of the basic concepts and principles of chemistry designed for non-science majors. An introduction to the basic language of chemistry, the basic systems of inorganic, organic, and biochemistry, and their application to everyday life and the general ecosystem. Topics may include the chemistry of drugs, household products, energy resources, air resources, and material resources. This course is designed for students who are not majoring in chemistry as well as for those fulfilling a lab science requirement in their degree. One semester of high school science expected. Prerequisites: E, M, R.
  
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    CHEM 104 - Introduction to Chemistry Lab


    Credit(s): 1
    Contact Hours: 2

    This course provides lab experiences associated with CHEM 102 . When possible, CHEM-104 should be taken concurrently with CHEM 102 .
  
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    CHEM 107 - Human Chemistry


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 6

    An introduction to the concepts of inorganic, organic, and biological chemistry for students in nursing and other Life Science majors. Subjects will include metric units, state of matter, atomic structure, energy transfer, gases, atomic energy, solution concentration, oxidation reduction, acids, bases, and salts. It will briefly cover carbon compounds, biochemical compounds, and metabolic pathways. Application to life situations will be made whenever possible. Prerequisites: M.
  
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    CHEM 108 - Technical Chemistry


    Credit(s): 5
    Contact Hours: 7

    This course is a one-semester general chemistry course. This course emphasizes laboratory techniques and safety, units of measurement, atoms, elements, periodicity, stoichiometry, solutions, acid-base theory, gas laws, thermochemistry, and basic organic chemistry. Not intended for students requiring additional chemistry courses. Prerequisites: One year high school chemistry or CHEM 090 , and “C” or better in MATH 105  or MATH 106  or appropriate score on the mathematics placement exam. Permission of instructor required.
  
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    CHEM 110 - General Chemistry I


    Credit(s): 5
    Contact Hours: 7

    The first semester of a two semester general chemistry course designed to meet the needs of science students. The course covers units of measurement, the structure of atoms, nomenclature, stoichiometric relationships and calculations, bonding, and states of matter. Prior to taking CHEM 112 , be sure to enroll in MATH 110  concurrently with CHEM-110. Prerequisites: One year of high school chemistry or “C” or better in CHEM-090 or “C” or better in CHEM 103  or “C” or better in CHEM 102  and CHEM 104 , and “C” or better in MATH 105  or appropriate score on the mathematics placement exam.
  
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    CHEM 112 - General Chemistry II


    Credit(s): 5
    Contact Hours: 7

    The second semester of a two semester general chemistry course designed to meet the needs of science students. The course covers properties of solutions, chemical equilibria, basic kinetics and thermodynamics, acid/base theory, and electrochemistry. Prerequisite: “C” or better in both CHEM 110  and MATH 110 .
  
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    CHEM 201 - Organic Chemistry I


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 6

    The first semester of a two semester organic chemistry course designed to meet the needs of science students. The course covers a survey of various organic functional groups, stereochemistry, nomenclature and reactions of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, and aromaticity. Prerequisites: “C” or better in CHEM 112 .
  
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    CHEM 202 - Organic Chemistry II


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 6

    The second semester of a two semester organic chemistry course designed to meet the needs of science students. The course covers a survey of spectroscopic techniques, including Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy, nomenclature and reactions of various organic functional groups, including alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives. Prerequisite: “C” or better in CHEM 201 .

Communications

  
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    COMM 103 - Interpersonal Communication


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    Principles and practices of effective communication through readings, lectures, discussions, and demonstrations. Special focus is on how personal, social, and professional relationships are established, defined, and maintained through verbal and nonverbal interaction. Contemporary concerns of gender, ethics, and global/cultural awareness are addressed.
  
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    COMM 103H - Interpersonal Communication - Honors


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    Principles and practices of effective communication through readings, lectures, discussions, and demonstrations. Special focus on how personal, social, and professional relationships are established, defined, and maintained through verbal and nonverbal interaction. Contemporary concerns of gender, ethics, and global/cultural awareness are addressed. This is an Honors course which requires additional work and academic rigor. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Honors Program.
  
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    COMM 104 - Public Speaking


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    Students will receive training in speech making with emphasis on preparation, delivery, and evaluation. Also studied are famous speeches, group communications, and panel discussions.
  
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    COMM 120 - Small Group Process


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    Participation, decision-making, and problem-solving in small groups. Students participate in groups and evaluate group functioning from the perspective of small group communication concepts through the study of theory, application, and practical experience. Prerequisites: E, R.
  
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    COMM 201 - Mass Communication & Popular Culture


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course examines the impact of mediated communication on our culture. Emphasis will be placed on description, analysis, interpretation, and evaluation of mass media forms and their integration in modern society. Meets Humanities requirement. Prerequisites: E, R.
  
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    COMM 225 - Introduction to Film: History and Interpretation


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 4

    In this course, students will study the historical development of film from its inception as a “side show amusement” to what has become, arguably, the dominant art form in modern culture. We will look at film from technical, historical, and cultural perspectives, studying film as both an artistic medium and a means of cultural and artistic expression. We will also discuss the effects of film upon our visual modern culture. Frequent written and oral response is required. Meets the Humanities requirement. Prerequisites: E, R.

Computer Aided Design

  
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    CADD 112 - CAD Computer Technology


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 5

    A study of computer technology and graphic methods as they apply to Computer Aided Design. Topics include operating systems, networks, pc technology and troubleshooting, the Internet, Microsoft Office, desktop publishing and computer graphics, scanning technology, video and audio capture, animation, virtual reality, and artificial intelligence.
  
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    CADD 115 - CAD Foundations


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 5

    An in-depth study of the theoretical principles and graphical methods currently employed in industry. Emphasis is placed on learning basic and higher level concepts in addition to acquiring fundamental CAD skills. Drafting topics covered include geometric construction, technical sketching, orthographic projection, axonometric projection/drawing, oblique projection/drawing, perspective projection/drawing, dimensioning, sections, and primary and secondary auxiliary views. Computer topics include operating systems, AutoCAD system configuration, AutoCAD fundamentals, software and hardware compatibility.
  
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    CADD 120 - AutoCAD


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 5

    An in-depth study of the AutoCAD software with emphasis on learning the application. Topics include: operating system fundamentals, user interface, object creation and modification, editing, layers, properties, paper space and model space concepts, dimensioning and dimensioning variables, blocks, attributes, three dimensional construction, solid modeling and scripts.
  
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    CADD 122 - Dimensioning & Tolerancing


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 5

    A study of dimensioning and tolerancing as applied to mechanical and architectural documentation. Topics include: dimensioning, detail dimensioning, dimensioning techniques, tolerancing, GDT symbology, datums, and tolerance calculations.
  
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    CADD 125 - Drafting/Modeling-Mechanical


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 5

    A study of the appropriate application of drafting/modeling conventions and standard practices in the mechanical area. The course stresses attention to detail and critical thinking. The course is grounded in the practical application of descriptive geometry.
  
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    CADD 135 - Descriptive Geometry


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 5

    A topical study of the graphical methods used in solving established descriptive geometry problems. Emphasis is placed on understanding three dimensional spatial relationships in connection with: 1) successive auxiliary views, 2) revolution, 3) sections and developments, and 4) vector analysis.
  
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    CADD 215 - Feature Based Parametric Modeling


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 5

    An in-depth study of Feature Based Parametric Modeling software with emphasis on learning an application. Topics include: Principles of Solid Modeling, parametric design, generation of bill of materials, creating symbols, assembly modeling, and automated associated drafting.
  
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    CADD 226 - SolidWorks


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 5

    An in-depth study of the SolidWorks software with emphasis on learning the application. Topics include: Principles of Solid Modeling, parametric design, generation of bill of materials, creating symbols, assembly modeling, and automated associated drafting.
  
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    CADD 240 - Drafting/Modeling-Architecture


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 5

    A concentrated study of traditional architectural design documentation practices. Emphasis is placed on correct graphical representation and understanding basic design constraints typically associated with conventional housing.
  
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    CADD 255 - Team Problem Solving


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 5

    A study of the systematic processes controlling and guiding product design development, and construction/manufacture. Topics include: aesthetics, design principles, and design processes. Emphasis is placed on planning, analysis, evaluation and critical thinking.
  
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    CADD 257 - Rapid Prototyping


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 5

    An in-depth study of Rapid Prototyping and CNC techniques. Three-dimensional models of complex geometry will be created and exported for use in building physical models with a 3D Printer and a 3D Router.
  
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    CADD 272 - CAD Internship/Co-op


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course provides an opportunity to receive credit for directly related CAD work experience. Development of employability, communication, and team building skills is an expected outcome. Students must document 120 working hours on the job. The co-op criteria and specific requirements are outlined in the Bay College Co-operative Education and Internship handbook. Contact the instructor for a copy of the handbook. Prerequisites: 6 credits completed in the major field of study, CADD 125 , CADD 135 , and permission of instructor. Internships & Co-ops may require that the student pass a criminal background check.

Computer Information Systems

  
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    CIS 090 - Basic Computer Literacy


    Credit(s): 1
    Contact Hours: 1.5

    This transitional course is designed as a foundation for those with little or no computer experience. Students will develop basic skill sets in computer operations, the Windows operating system, the Internet including Web and e-mail, and word processing. Students will develop basic computer skills for both personal and academic needs, as well as prepare for higher level courses. This course does not fulfill degree requirements.
  
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    CIS 100 - Introduction to Windows


    Credit(s): 1
    Contact Hours: 1

    Students will learn the essential skills required to use a computer with the Windows operating system. The student will learn to interact with the Windows desktop to access software and data. The course emphasizes the importance of file and folder maintenance. The course also includes an introduction to Windows utilities and customizing tools.
  
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    CIS 101 - Computer Concepts & Applications


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    This course will provide students with a fundamental level of computer literacy necessary in today’s digital age. Topics will include hardware, software, the Internet, security, networks, and ethics. The course will focus on current technology issues as they apply to a student’s professional and personal life. Students will also complete assignments using the most widely used application programs. Students may be required to use the computer lab to complete computer assignments.
 

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