2020-2021 College Catalog 
    
    Mar 08, 2021  
2020-2021 College Catalog

Course Descriptions


Basic Skill Prerequisites

E = English Composition
M = Mathematics
R = Reading

 

Health

  
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    HLTH 271 - Health Care Co-op


    Credit(s): 1
    Contact Hours: 1

    This co-operative work experience will provide students with an opportunity to receive credit for directly related health care experiences in the specialty field of choice. The student experience outcomes include observation and hands-on practice in addition to the development of employability, communication, and team-building skills. Students must complete 40 hours per credit on the job. The Co-op criteria and specific requirements are outlined in the Bay College Co-operative Education and Internship Handbook. Prerequisites: HLTH 100 , HLTH 103 , HLTH 104 , HLTH 110 ; 25 credits completed in Health Careers Certificate Program; a grade point average of 2.0 or higher; proof of being certified from the American Heart Association CPR for Healthcare Provider Course; completion of health physical and immunizations; successfully passed a Live Scan fingerprint criminal background check and 7 panel drug screen; and permission of advisor.
  
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    HLTH 272 - Health Care Co-op


    Credit(s): 2
    Contact Hours: 2

    This co-operative work experience will provide students with an opportunity to receive credit for directly related health care experiences in the specialty field of choice. The student experience outcomes include observation and hands-on practice in addition to the development of employability, communication, and team-building skills. Students must complete 40 hours per credit on the job. The Co-op criteria and specific requirements are outlined in the Bay College Co-operative Education and Internship Handbook. Prerequisites: HLTH 100 , HLTH 103 , HLTH 104 , HLTH 110 ; 25 credits completed in Health Careers Certificate Program; a grade point average of 2.0 or higher; proof of being certified from the American Heart Association CPR for Healthcare Provider Course; completion of health physical and immunizations; successfully passed a Live Scan fingerprint criminal background check and 7 panel drug screen; and permission of advisor.
  
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    HLTH 273 - Health Care Co-op


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This co-operative work experience will provide students with an opportunity to receive credit for directly related health care experiences in the specialty field of choice. The student experience outcomes include observation and hands-on practice in addition to the development of employability, communication, and team-building skills. Students must complete 40 hours per credit on the job. The Co-op criteria and specific requirements are outlined in the Bay College Co-operative Education and Internship Handbook. Prerequisites: HLTH 100 , HLTH 103 , HLTH 104 , HLTH 110 ; 25 credits completed in Health Careers Certificate Program; a grade point average of 2.0 or higher; proof of being certified from the American Heart Association CPR for Healthcare Provider Course; completion of health physical and immunizations; successfully passed a Live Scan fingerprint criminal background check and 7 panel drug screen; and permission of advisor.
  
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    HLTH 274 - Health Care Co-op


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    This co-operative work experience will provide students with an opportunity to receive credit for directly related health care experiences in the specialty field of choice. The student experience outcomes include observation and hands-on practice in addition to the development of employability, communication, and team-building skills. Students must complete 40 hours per credit on the job. The Co-op criteria and specific requirements are outlined in the Bay College Co-operative Education and Internship Handbook. Prerequisites: HLTH 100 , HLTH 103 , HLTH 104 , HLTH 110 ; 25 credits completed in Health Careers Certificate Program; a grade point average of 2.0 or higher; proof of being certified from the American Heart Association CPR for Healthcare Provider Course; completion of health physical and immunizations; successfully passed a Live Scan fingerprint criminal background check and 7 panel drug screen; and permission of advisor.

History

  
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    HIST 101 - Western Civilization to 1600


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    A survey of the history of Western Civilization from its prehistoric roots through the Reformation Era. This study will investigate the origin and development of cultural trends from the civilizations of the Mediterranean through the era of European Feudalism, culminating in the emergence of Modern Europe. This course will include a study of political history, philosophy, literature, architecture, and religion. Meets the Humanities and Social & Behavioral Science requirements. Prerequisite: R.
  
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    HIST 101H - Western Civilization to 1600 - Honors


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    A survey of the history of Western Civilization from its prehistoric roots through the Reformation Era. This study will investigate the origin and development of cultural trends from the civilizations of the Mediterranean through the era of European Feudalism, culminating in the emergence of Modern Europe. This course will include a study of political history, philosophy, literature, architecture, and religion. Meets the Humanities and Social & Behavioral Science requirements. This is an Honors course which requires additional work and academic rigor. Prerequisite: R and acceptance into the Honors Program.
  
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    HIST 102 - Western Civilization 1600 to Present


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    A continuation of HIST 101  emphasizing political, economic, and cultural changes of the 18th century, and the various forms of nationalism, international socialism, and their influences on the 19th and 20th century and the search for international peace with the increasing complexity of the emerging nations of the Third World. This course will include a study of political history, philosophy, and literature. HIST 101  is not required. Meets the Humanities and Social & Behavioral Science requirements. Prerequisite: R.
  
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    HIST 102H - Western Civilization 1600 to Present - Honors


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    A continuation of HIST 101  emphasizing political, economic, and cultural changes of the 18th century, and the various forms of nationalism, international socialism, and their influences on the 19th and 20th century and the search for international peace with the increasing complexity of the emerging nations of the Third World. This course will include a study of political history, philosophy, and literature. HIST 101  is not required. Meets the Humanities and Social & Behavioral Science requirements. This is an Honors course which requires additional work and academic rigor. Prerequisites: R and acceptance into the Honors Program.
  
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    HIST 211 - United States History to 1865


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course provides students with an opportunity to learn the history of the United States from its colonial origins to the Civil War, with an emphasis on the dynamics of sectionalism that led to the War Between the States. Political, economic, and social topics are studied in relationship to the course theme. Meets the Social & Behavioral Science requirement.
  
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    HIST 211H - United States History to 1865 - Honors


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course provides students with an opportunity to learn the history of the United States from its colonial origins to the Civil War, with an emphasis on the dynamics of sectionalism that led to the War Between the States. Political, economic, and social topics are studied in relationship to the course theme. Meets the Social & Behavioral Science requirement. This is an Honors course which requires additional work and academic rigor. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Honors Program.
  
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    HIST 212 - United States History 1865 - Present


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course provides students with an opportunity to learn the history of the United States from the post-Civil War era into the modern context, with an emphasis on the emergence of the United States as a progressive world power. Political, economic, and social topics are studied in relationship to the course theme. Meets the Social & Behavioral Science requirement.
  
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    HIST 212H - United States History 1865 - Present - Honors


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course provides students with an opportunity to learn the history of the United States from the post-Civil War era into the modern context, with an emphasis on the emergence of the United States as a progressive world power. Political, economic, and social topics are studied in relationship to the course theme. Meets the Social & Behavioral Science requirement. This is an Honors course which requires additional work and academic rigor. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Honors Program.
  
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    HIST 220 - Michigan History


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course provides students with the opportunity to study, in a chronological and seminar-like approach, the progression of the collective choices of generations of individual Americans in Michigan from the Colonial Era to the late 20th century Michigan economy. The organization of this course will include social, economic and political issues. Meets the Social & Behavioral Science requirement.
  
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    HIST 224 - Native American History


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course provides students with the opportunity to learn about Native American history from the pre-contact period to the modern era. A variety of Native American cultures will be studied in various historical contexts, along with the cultural, economic, and political interrelationships of First Peoples with other cultural groups. Meets the Social & Behavioral Science requirement.
  
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    HIST 228 - American Women’s History


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course provides students with the opportunity to learn about women’s history in the United States from the Colonial to the modern era by examining the social, cultural, political, and economic experiences and roles of women. Meets Social & Behavioral Science requirement.
  
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    HIST 232 - History of Technology in America


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course provides students with the opportunity to learn about the history of technology in the United States. International contexts will be covered, but primary emphasis will be on the history and role of technological development and innovation in America. Given that the United States often is labeled the “technological society,” broadly speaking students will be provided with the opportunity to learn about the various intersections of technology with society and politics from the Colonial Era through today. This includes coverage of the history of communication, transportation, applied and general science, and medical technologies. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement.
  
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    HIST 232H - History of Technology in America - Honors


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course provides students with the opportunity to learn about the history of technology in the United States. International contexts will be covered, but primary emphasis will be on the history and role of technological development and innovation in America. Given that the United States often is labeled the “technological society,” broadly speaking students will be provided with the opportunity to learn about the various intersections of technology with society and politics from the Colonial Era through today. This includes coverage of the history of communication, transportation, applied and general science, and medical technologies. Meets the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. This is an Honors course which requires additional work and academic rigor. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Honors Program.

Hospitality Management

  
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    HMGT 101 - Introduction to the Hospitality Industry


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course will take a management perspective in introducing students to the organization and structure of hotels, restaurants, clubs, cruise ships, and casino hotels.
  
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    HMGT 102 - Food Safety: ServeSafe


    Credit(s): 2
    Contact Hours: 2

    This course is designed to introduce students to the importance of food safety throughout the restaurant and foodservice industry. This course will cover information on providing safe foods, contamination, and food allergies, the flow of food through the food operations system, sanitary facilities, and pest management regulations and training.
  
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    HMGT 103 - Supervision in the Hospitality Industry


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course will provide students with the principles of supervision as they apply to the hospitality industry. Students will be prepared to meet the expectations of managers, guests, employees, and governmental agencies.
  
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    HMGT 201 - Planning and Control for Food & Beverage Operations


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course will provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary for the control processes used to reduce costs in food and beverage operations worldwide, knowledge on multi-unit management, and an increase focus on technological applications.
  
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    HMGT 202 - Hotel Operations Management


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course presents a systematic approach to front office procedures by detailing the flow of business through a hotel property, from the reservations process to account settlement, housekeeping and security. Students will demonstrate their knowledge and management skills in the delivery of high quality customer service, front desk profitability, and e-commerce impact on hotel operations.
  
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    HMGT 204 - Managing Human Resources in the Hospitality Industry


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    In this course students will demonstrate their knowledge and skill level in the management of human resources within a hospitality operation; including, trends and approaches to performance appraisals, orientation programs, maintaining employee demographics, and managing union and labor relation contracts.
  
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    HMGT 205 - Hospitality Purchasing Management


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    In this course, students will understand and demonstrate their knowledge in the principles and practices of purchasing; including negotiation, data management, distribution, price forecasting and market analysis. The students will develop critical thinking and problem solving skills, develop math and accounting skills, and data management as they apply to purchasing management.
  
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    HMGT 206 - Food & Beverage Operations Management


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the management processes in food and beverage operations. All aspects of food and beverage operations are covered, including organization, marketing, menus, costs and pricing, production, service, safety and finances.

Human Services

  
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    HSER 100 - Introduction to Human Services


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course introduces the student to the basic conceptual knowledge of social service agencies and the role of the human service worker. Included are the beginning skills for social service practice and discussion of the ethical commitments and legal considerations underlying professional human service careers. Students will gain first-hand knowledge of working with various human service populations by volunteering with local agencies and tying course material to their experience. Various groups and populations that are served by human service workers are also covered.
  
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    HSER 150 - Ethics in Human Services


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    Ethical principles and practices of human service workers are examined and practiced to prepare students for work in human services agencies. The roles, functions, and legal and ethical responsibilities of the human service worker are investigated and discussed throughout. Students will learn the importance of using ethics to evaluate situations with clients and coworkers in human services.
  
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    HSER 160 - Interviewing Strategies & Techniques


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    An introduction to the components of interviewing and counseling within human services. The characteristics and roles of interviewer and counselor will be explored and practiced by the student. This class involves role play, video analysis, and audio and video taping of student interviews. Prerequisites: HSER 100 , COMM 103 .
  
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    HSER 272 - Human Services Internship


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    Students who have satisfactorily completed human service courses may be placed with an approved human service agency on a part-time basis and earn credits for satisfactory work performance. Participation requires approval of the human service coordinator. Evaluation of student’s performance will be carried out by the student’s supervisor at the participating agency in conjunction with the coordinator. Prerequisites: HSER 100 , HSER 150 , HSER 160 , and approval of the human service coordinator and agency supervisor. 40 contact hours are required for every hour of credit earned for a total of 120 hours. Students must take HSER-272 and may elect to take HSER 273 ; however, each course must be with a different agency. Student must be a sophomore and in good standing with a GPA of 2.0 or greater. A background check is required for internship placement.
  
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    HSER 273 - Human Services Internship


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    Students who have satisfactorily completed human service courses may be placed with an approved human service agency on a part-time basis and earn credits for satisfactory work performance. Participation requires approval of the human service coordinator. Evaluation of student’s performance will be carried out by the student’s supervisor at the participating agency in conjunction with the coordinator. Prerequisites: HSER 100 , HSER 150 , HSER 160 , and approval of the human service coordinator and agency supervisor. 40 contact hours are required for every hour of credit earned for a total of 120 hours. Students must take HSER 272  and may elect to take HSER-273; however, each course must be with a different agency. Student must be a sophomore and in good standing with a GPA of 2.0 or greater. A background check is required for internship placement.

Leadership

  
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    LEAD 200 - Introduction to Leadership


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course introduces students to the historical and theoretical foundations of effective leadership and enables students to directly apply this knowledge to assess and develop their own practical leadership skills. The course examines leadership theories, styles, and approaches related to power, ethics, gender, socio-cultural issues, and global social change. Case studies, group activities, role playing, leadership interviews, guest speakers, film analyses, and personal behavioral assessment surveys are utilized. The course complements several academic programs including business, education, public administration, health professions, military science, human services, law, organizational communication, and public relations. Meets the Social & Behavioral Science requirement. Prerequisites: E, R.
  
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    LEAD 200H - Introduction to Leadership - Honors


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course introduces students to the historical and theoretical foundations of effective leadership, and enables students to directly apply this knowledge to assess and develop their own practical leadership skills. The course examines leadership theories, styles, and approaches related to power, ethics, gender, socio-cultural issues, and global social change. Case studies, group activities, role playing, leadership interviews, guest speakers, film analyses, and personal behavioral assessment surveys are utilized. The course complements several academic programs including business, education, public administration, health professions, military science, human services, law, organizational communication, and public relations. Meets the Social & Behavioral Science requirement. This is an Honors course which requires additional work and academic rigor. Prerequisites: E, R, and Acceptance into the Honors Program.

Mathematics

  
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    MATH 085 - Pre-Algebra


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    This course is designed to strengthen the arithmetic skills of the students. Topics covered include: operation of whole numbers, fractions, percents, decimals, ratios, integers, exponents, operations with signed numbers, an introduction to geometry, and an introduction to algebra. Information on math test taking strategies and study skills will be presented and practiced along with college success content. This course is developmental in nature and cannot be used toward any associate degree. No calculators are permitted.
  
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    MATH 095 - Basic Algebra


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    A study of the fundamental concepts and operations of algebra, polynomials, equations, application problems, factoring, introduction to functions and graphs, systems of linear equations, exponents, and simple quadratic equations. This course is developmental in nature and cannot be used toward any associate degree. No calculators are permitted. Prerequisite: “C” or better in MATH 085 , or an appropriate score on a math placement test.
  
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    MATH 097 - Mathematical Literacy


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    MATH-097 is designed for students in majors that do not require Intermediate or College Algebra. It can serve as a pre-requisite to MATH 107 - Liberal Arts Mathematics  (which meets the MTA math requirement) or BUSN 177 - Mathematics of Business . The course integrates numeracy, algebraic reasoning, data literacy, functions, equations, and modeling along with college success content. It is a Transitional Studies course and does not meet the MTA math requirement. A scientific calculator is required. Prerequisite: “C” or better in MATH 085 , or appropriate score on a math placement test.
  
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    MATH 098 - Accelerated Pre & Basic Algebra


    Credit(s): 6
    Contact Hours: 6

    This course is designed for a student who is comfortable with the basic arithmetic operations without a calculator to quickly review arithmetical concepts, and provide the student with a solid algebraic foundation which is required in college-level math courses. Topics covered include: operation of whole numbers, fractions, percentages, decimals, ratios, integers, exponents, operations with signed numbers, an introduction to geometry, algebra, polynomials, equations, and stated problems, factoring, introduction to functions and graphs, systems of linear equations, exponents, and quadratic equations. Information on math test taking strategies and study skills will be presented and practiced along with college success content. This course is developmental in nature and cannot be used to fulfill requirements for any certificate or degree.
  
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    MATH 102 - Introduction to Technical Math


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    Topics include basic algebra formula usage, signed numbers, practical measurements, metrics and conversions, relative error, basic geometry, and right triangle trigonometry. This course is designed to meet occupational program requirements or as a preparation for MATH 106  for those needing more advanced mathematics. Scientific/graphing calculator required. Prerequisite: “C” or better in MATH 085 , or appropriate score on a math placement test.
  
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    MATH 105 - Intermediate Algebra


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    A study of real numbers, algebraic expressions, exponents, complex numbers, solution of linear inequalities, quadratic equations and absolute value equations, equations of lines, conic sections, functions, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, exponential and logarithmic equations, and systems of equations. This course is designed to prepare students for MATH 110 - College Algebra . This course may be used as an elective course; however, it does not fulfill the natural science requirement for the Associate of Science degree or the MTA agreement. A scientific calculator is required. Prerequisite: “C” or better in MATH 095 , or MATH 098 , or appropriate score in a math placement test.
  
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    MATH 106 - Technical Algebra & Trigonometry I


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    Topics include: A review of geometry, linear and quadratic equations, determinants, systems of equations, exponents, radicals, scientific notation, functions and graphs, trigonometry, vectors, radians measure, and technical formulas. This course is intended as a capstone course for technical students. Not intended for students requiring additional math courses. Graphing calculator is required. Prerequisite: “C” or better in MATH 102 , or MATH 095 , or MATH 098 , or appropriate score on a math placement test.
  
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    MATH 107 - Liberal Arts Mathematics


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will understand and be able to use mathematics in a variety of practical applications, including topics in graph theory, probability, statistics, theory of numbers, coding theory, and financial math. These topics will be presented along with real world applications such as street networks, planning and scheduling, and voting schemes, with an emphasis on problem solving. This course is designed for transfer students in the Associate of Arts program and is an MTA approved course. A scientific calculator is required. Prerequisite: “C” or better in MATH 095 , MATH 097 , or MATH 098 , or appropriate score on a math placement test.
  
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    MATH 110 - College Algebra


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    A study of equations, systems of equations, inequalities, functions and their graphs, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, complex numbers, and theory of equations. Graphing calculator is required. Prerequisite: “C” or better in MATH 105 , or better or appropriate score on a math placement test.
  
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    MATH 111 - Trigonometry


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    A study of the trigonometric functions, their properties, solutions of right and oblique triangles, radian measure, graphs, identities, trigonometric equations, applications, with optional topics of vectors in the plane, complex numbers, and polar coordinates. A graphing calculator is required. Qualified students may enroll in MATH-111 and MATH 141  during the same semester. Prerequisite: “C” or better in MATH 110 , or appropriate score on a math placement test.
  
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    MATH 130 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    Introduction to logic and problem solving, set theory, numeration systems, fundamental concepts and structures of numbers and mathematics. Course is designed for elementary education students. MATH 105   or MATH 107   with a “C” or better or appropriate score on mathematics placement test.
  
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    MATH 140 - Precalculus


    Credit(s): 5
    Contact Hours: 5

    This course provides the necessary foundation for students who plan to study Calculus. This course examines the behavior of linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Other topics include trigonometric identities, systems of equations, inequalities, complex numbers, the conics, polar coordinates, sequences, series, and limits. Graphing calculator required.  ‘C’ or better in MATH 105  or the appropriate score on math placement test.
  
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    MATH 141 - Analytical Geometry & Calculus I


    Credit(s): 5
    Contact Hours: 5

    Functions and graphs, limits, differentiation of algebraic and trigonometric functions, exponential, and logarithmic functions, applications, the Mean Value theorem, definite and indefinite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of integral calculus. Qualified students may enroll in MATH 111  and MATH-141 during the same semester. Graphing calculator required. Prerequisites: “C” or better in MATH 110  and MATH 111  (or high school trigonometry), or appropriate score on math placement test.
  
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    MATH 142 - Analytical Geometry & Calculus II


    Credit(s): 5
    Contact Hours: 5

    Continuation of MATH 141  with techniques of integration; exponential, logarithmic, inverse trigonometric and hyperbolic functions, vectors; L’Hospital’s Rule; improper integrals, sequences and series. Graphing calculator required. Prerequisite: “C” or better in MATH 141 .
  
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    MATH 210 - Introduction to Statistics


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    A computer supported study of descriptive statistics, statistical inference, probability distribution, sampling, estimation, testing hypotheses, correlation, and regression. Scientific / graphing calculator required. Satisfies MTA Math requirement. Prerequisite: “C” or better in MATH 105 , or MATH 107 , or appropriate score on a math placement test.
  
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    MATH 243 - Analytical Geometry & Calculus III


    Credit(s): 5
    Contact Hours: 5

    Continuation of MATH 142  with topics including analytical geometry and three dimensional space, conics, spherical, polar, cylindrical coordinates, partial derivatives, multiple integration, and line integrals. Graphing calculator required Prerequisite: “C” or better in MATH 142 .
  
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    MATH 244 - Differential Equations


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    Topics will include first order equations, linear and nonlinear equations, separation of variables, integration factors, exact equations, Bernoulli equations, variation of parameters, reduction of order, differential operators, LaPlace transforms, applications, and solving systems of differential equations. Graphing calculator required. Prerequisite: “C” or better in MATH 243 .
  
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    MATH 250 - Introduction to Linear Algebra


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    Upon successful completion of this course, a student should understand systems of equations, vectors and vector notation, matrices and matrix algebra, orthogonality, determinants, subspaces, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Prerequisites: “C” or better in MATH 141 .

Music

  
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    MUSC 101 - Music for Early Childhood Educators


    Credit(s): 1
    Contact Hours: 1

    This course will help students understand the importance of exposing very young children to music and enable students to lead music in the early childhood environment with confidence and with an understanding of basic principles of music skill acquisition in early childhood.
  
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    MUSC 109 - Applied Music


    Credit(s): 1
    Contact Hours: 1

    Individual instruction on specific instruments or voice with emphasis on correct physical orientation to the instrument (or voice), study of appropriate exercise and solo repertoire, including scales, arpeggios, etc., and preparation and performance of standard compositions at appropriate level for the student.
  
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    MUSC 110 - Applied Music


    Credit(s): 1
    Contact Hours: 1

    Individual instruction on specific instruments or voice with emphasis on correct physical orientation to the instrument (or voice), study of appropriate exercise and solo repertoire, including scales, arpeggios, etc., and preparation and performance of standard compositions at appropriate level for the student.
  
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    MUSC 111 - Applied Music


    Credit(s): 1
    Contact Hours: 1

    Individual instruction on specific instruments or voice with emphasis on correct physical orientation to the instrument (or voice), study of appropriate exercise and solo repertoire, including scales, arpeggios, etc., and preparation and performance of standard compositions at appropriate level for the student.
  
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    MUSC 112 - Applied Music


    Credit(s): 1
    Contact Hours: 1

    Individual instruction on specific instruments or voice with emphasis on correct physical orientation to the instrument (or voice), study of appropriate exercise and solo repertoire, including scales, arpeggios, etc., and preparation and performance of standard compositions at appropriate level for the student.
  
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    MUSC 141 - Chorus


    Credit(s): 1
    Contact Hours: 1

    An opportunity for students to practice and perform a variety of choral music under the direction of the Bay de Noc Choral Society.
  
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    MUSC 151 - Elements of Music


    Credit(s): 2
    Contact Hours: 2

    This course introduces the fundamentals of music to non-music majors and music majors who have not yet had music theory. Pitch, rhythm, melody, harmony, and notation will be explored. Lectures will include numerous musical examples to illustrate musical concepts and structures. Ear training will be an important and regular activity for this course.
  
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    MUSC 153 - Music Appreciation


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    Music Appreciation is a comprehensive survey of western music form and style from the Medieval period to present day. Asian, African and Native American musical styles are also explored. Biographical information on major composers is included and students will recognize many of their best known works from each style period. A study of each period also includes historical background on art, world events, technology and political and religious influences. Class discussion is encouraged as these “external factors” still affect the arts today. Each class meeting involves lecture and multimedia presentations. Music Appreciation is offered to general college students who have little or no musical background. Meets Humanities requirement.
  
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    MUSC 153H - Music Appreciation - Honors


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    Music Appreciation is a comprehensive survey of western music form and style from the Medieval period to present day. Asian, African, and Native American musical styles are also explored. Biographical information on major composers is included and students will recognize many of their best known works from each style period. A study of each period also includes historical background on art, world events, technology and political and religious influences. Class discussion is encouraged as these “external factors” still affect the arts today. Each class meeting involves lecture and multimedia presentations. Music Appreciation is offered to general college students who have little or no musical background. Meets Humanities requirement. This is an Honors course which requires additional work and academic rigor. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Honors Program.
  
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    MUSC 154 - Popular Music Styles


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    A survey of popular music styles from 1900 to present day. Students will recognize various styles which will include ragtime, pop, swing, big band, jazz, blues, country, rock, and hip hop in relation to historical, political, and technical influences.
  
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    MUSC 220 - Music Theory


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    Music Theory is a course for the student interested in a music curriculum as a major or minor field of study. It is concerned with the theoretical concepts on which music is based, including melodic, rhythmic, harmonic, contrapuntal, and architectural factors. Three areas will be stressed: 1) written concepts, terminology, and notation; 2) exercises in music reading and sight-singing; and 3) practice in ear training and dictation. Prerequisite: MUSC 151  or permission of instructor.

Nursing

  
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    NURS 101 - Nursing Fundamentals


    Credit(s): 2
    Contact Hours: 2

    The purpose of this theory course is to aid the student in acquiring the basic knowledge of nursing fundamentals. Students are introduced to the theory, interpersonal skills, and nursing procedures that will enable them to work successfully with persons, to be able to recognize through assessment and evaluation, changes in pattern manifestation. The nursing process, nursing diagnosis, and nursing care planning fundamental to nursing are introduced and discussed. Development of cognitive skills in the area of nursing assessment will expand the nurses’ contribution to the health of persons. Prerequisite: Admission to the Practical Nursing Program. To progress in the program, the student must maintain a grade of a “C” or better in general education and program courses. Co-requisite: NURS 102 .
  
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    NURS 102 - Nursing Fundamental Lab


    Credit(s): 2
    Contact Hours: 6

    This course is designed to develop cognitive, affective, psychomotor, communication, and assessment skills in a simulated clinical laboratory setting. Emphasis is on utilizing nursing concepts, beginning assessment and interview skills as a basis for nursing practice. This is taught using the conceptual framework of Martha Rogers “Science of Unitary Human Beings,” along with Marjory Gordon’s Functional Health Patterns. Prerequisite: Admission to the Practical Nursing Program. To progress in the program, the student must maintain a grade of a “P” or better in program course. Co-requisite: NURS 101 .
  
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    NURS 107 - Nursing Fundamental Clinics


    Credit(s): 2
    Contact Hours: 6

    This clinical course provides the student with the opportunity to apply a network of skills to the practice of nursing. Focus is on concepts of assessment and evaluation of pattern manifestation, communication skills, and basic patient care in the long term care facility. Admission to the Practical Nursing Program, “C” or better in BIOL 213  , NURS 101  , NURS 114  , and HLTH 140   and “P” in NURS 102 . To progress in the program, the student must maintain a grade of a “C” or better in BIOL 213  , NURS 101  , NURS 114   and HLTH 140   and “P” or better in NURS 102 .
  
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    NURS 114 - PN Pharmacology I


    Credit(s): 2
    Contact Hours: 2

    The purpose of this course is to aid the student in acquiring the fundamental principles of pharmacology. Major content areas include basic concepts of pharmacology, legal aspects, National Patient Safety Goals (client rights to safety in medication administration), nutrition as it relates to pharmacology, and identifying pattern manifestations of children, pregnant women, and adults. Other content areas include the introduction of the therapeutic effects of pain medications, and anti-diabetic medications; pharmacological effects on body tissues, human responses to drug therapy, and the application of assessment and evaluation in relation to prescribed drug therapy. Prerequisites: Admission to the Practical Nursing Program. To progress in the program, the student must maintain a grade of a “C” or better in general education and program courses.
  
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    NURS 115 - Nursing Assistant Course


    Credit(s): 5
    Contact Hours: 7

    This course, which is approved by the State of Michigan, is designed to prepare students to function as nursing assistants in long-term care facilities. This 5-7 week course consists of 40 hours lecture, 40 hours laboratory training, and 40 hours clinical training. Upon successful completion, students are eligible to take the State Competency Evaluation Test.
  
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    NURS 117 - Pharmacology II


    Credit(s): 2
    Contact Hours: 2

    The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to clinical therapy with emphasis on the knowledge needed to maximize therapeutic effects and prevent or minimize adverse effects of drugs. Major content areas include groups of therapeutic drugs, prototypes of drug groups, commonly prescribed individual drugs, effects on body tissues, human responses to drug therapy, in terms of pattern manifestation and applying assessment and evaluation, in relation to prescribed drug therapy regimens. Admission to the Practical Nursing Program, “C” or better in BIOL 213  , NURS 101  , NURS 114   and HLTH 140   and “P” in NURS 102 . To progress in the program, the student must maintain a grade of a “C” or better in BIOL 213  , NURS 101  , NURS 114   and HLTH 140   and “P” in NURS 102 .
  
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    NURS 118 - Nursing Informatics


    Credit(s): 2
    Contact Hours: 2

    The purpose of this course is to gain a basic understanding of nursing informatics and its application to education, research and practice in nursing and health occupation professions. Topics will include computer and informatics literacy, informatics competencies, application of informatics to healthcare trends. Competencies taught will meet the American Nurses Association Scope and Standards of Nursing Informatics Practice (ANA, 2010) for beginning nurses. Prerequisites: Officially accepted into the A.D.N. Program or permission of the instructor and basic computer and office software skills.
  
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    NURS 127 - PN Adult Health Nursing


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    This Theory course emphasizes concepts and the application of Martha Rogers Science of Unitary Human Beings. Students will utilize the nursing process to identify human patterning practice methods to assess and care for adult clients experiencing common health care problems. Core content will explore: critical thinking processes, the health care delivery system, legal and ethical responsibilities, cultural diversity, wellness concepts, alternative and complementary therapies, dealing with loss/grief/death, fluid and electrolyte management, acid-base balance, care of the surgical client, care of clients in rehab/hospice environments, care of geriatric clients, and care of clients with disorders associated with multiple body systems, and mental health functions. Admission to the Practical Nursing Program, “C” or better in BIOL 213  , NURS 101  , NURS 114  , and HLTH 140   and “P” in NURS 102 . To progress in the program, the student must maintain a grade of a “C” or better in BIOL 213  , NURS 101  , NURS 114  , and HLTH 140   and “P” or better in NURS 102 . Co-requisites: NURS 128  
  
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    NURS 128 - PN Adult Health Nursing Clinic


    Credit(s): 2
    Contact Hours: 6

    This clinical/lab/simulation course emphasizes the analytical use and application of Martha Rogers Science of Unitary Human Beings. Core content will focus on the development of health patterning practice skills to create and provide comprehensive holistic nursing care for patients across the life span experiencing common medical/surgical problems in acute care and outpatient environments. Admission to the Practical Nursing Program, “C” or better in BIOL 213  , NURS 101  , NURS 114, and HLTH 140 and “P” in NURS 102. To progress in the program, the student must maintain a grade of a “C” or better in BIOL 213  , NURS 101  , NURS 114   and HLTH 140   and “P” or better in NURS 102  . NURS 107  
  
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    NURS 130 - Foundations of Nursing


    Credit(s): 6
    Contact Hours: 12

    This introductory course is designed to provide students with the foundational concepts of professional, evidence-based nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on the identification of basic human profile needs, physical assessment and the nursing process, fundamental nursing skills, professional practice, and concepts relevant to patient-centered nursing care across the lifespan. This course includes a lecture, laboratory and clinical component. Officially accepted into the A.D.N. Program and following the required sequence of courses. To progress in the program, the student must maintain a grade of “C” or better in general education and program courses
  
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    NURS 134 - Health Concepts I


    Credit(s): 5
    Contact Hours: 9

    The didactic portion of this course is designed help beginning level students develop an understanding of concepts within the domains of the individual, healthcare and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of Homeostasis and Regulation, Protection and Movement, Nursing Attributes and Roles, Care Competencies and Health Care Delivery. The clinical/lab/simulation component of this course is designed to assist beginning students in the application and interpretation of individual, healthcare and nursing concepts in adult patients experiencing common health alterations in the acute care setting. Officially accepted into ADN program and ‘C’ or better in BIOL 213  , ENGL 101  , NURS 130  , and HLTH 116  . To progress in the program the student must maintain grade of a “C” or better in general education and program courses
  
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    NURS 136 - Leadership in Nursing


    Credit(s): 2
    Contact Hours: 2

    This course is designed to further develop the associate degree nursing student use of the concepts within the three domains of profile, process, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of: conflict and violence in the workplace, health-wellness and illness, collaboration, managing care, safety, advocacy, legal issues, policy, healthcare systems, ethics, accountability, and evidence-based practice. Upon completion, students should be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified in this course. There will also be a review of history of nursing and how it continues to impact our current role and attitudes in the profession of nursing. Officially accepted into the A.D.N. Program and ‘C’ or better in BIOL 276  , NURS 254 , and NURS 256  . To progress in the program the student must maintain grade of a “C” or better in general education and program courses.
  
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    NURS 139 - Behavioral Health Nursing


    Credit(s): 5
    Contact Hours: 9

    This course is designed to provide instructional, clinical/lab learning experiences in the provision of evidence-based nursing care to individuals experiencing psychiatric mental health disorders. The lecture portion of this course will emphasize the concepts of mood & affect, stress & coping, advocacy, safety, therapeutic communication and managing care. The clinical and lab components of this course are designed to assist students in integrating critical thinking and decision making throughout the nursing process to improve the care of patients experiencing psychiatric mental health disorders. Officially accepted into the A.D.N. Program and “C” or better in PSYC 201   and NURS 134  . To progress in the program the student must maintain grade of a “C” or better in general education and program courses.
  
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    NURS 141 - PN Family Nursing: Introduction


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 6

    The focus of this theory and clinical course will be the utilization of the nursing process in the care of the family throughout the childbearing years, newborn period, and during childhood. The theoretical aspect of this course introduces basic nursing care of the family unit, including: human reproduction, pregnancy, antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum care, newborn care, growth and development, and care of the child with common diseases and illnesses. Assessment of the various lifestyles, cultures, and concepts of the family, family roles, and interdependent relationships as they relate to the childbearing years will be incorporated. The clinical aspect of this course involves direct individual nursing care of the obstetrical, neonatal, and pediatric clients (gynecologic clients in certain facilities). Assessment of the client and family needs will be done utilizing Roger’s Science of Unitary Human Beings, Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, Erikson’s Eight Stages of Development, and Gordon’s Functional Health Patterns. Admission to the Practical Nursing Program, “C” or better in BIOL 214  , NURS 117   and NURS 127   and “P” in NURS 107   and NURS 128 . To progress in the program, the student must maintain a grade of a “C” or better in BIOL 214  , NURS 117   and NURS 127   and “P” in NURS 107   and NURS 128 .
  
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    NURS 142 - Bridge to RN Practice I


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course is designed for the Licensed Practical Nurse transitioning to Registered Nursing Practice. Emphasis is placed on introduction to the concepts of professional nursing practice as a registered nurse with a focus on concepts of professional nursing practice and patient profile related to the identification of basic human needs, the nursing process, and other concepts relevant to patient-centered nursing care across the lifespan. Additional emphasis is placed on the concepts of: conflict and violence in the workplace, health/wellness/illness, collaboration, managing care, safety, advocacy, legal issues, policy, healthcare systems, ethics accountability, and evidence-based practice. Upon completion, students should be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified in this course. There will also be review of the historical perspectives of nursing and its impact on the current role of the nurse and the healthcare environment. Officially accepted into the A.D.N. Bridge Program (370) and “C” or better in PSYC 201  , ENGL 101  , BIOL 213  , and BIOL 214 . Officially accepted into the A.D.N Bridge Program (370), unencumbered L.P.N license, and “C” or better in PSYC 201  , ENGL 101  , BIOL 213  , and BIOL 214 . To progress in the program, the student must maintain a grade of a “C” or better in program courses” Co-requisites: NURS 143 .
  
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    NURS 143 - Bridge to RN Practice II


    Credit(s): 1
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course is designed for the Licensed Practical Nurse transitioning to Registered Nursing Practice. Emphasis is placed on introduction of applying concepts of professional nursing practice as a registered nurse with a focus on concepts of professional nursing practice and patient profile related to patient-centered nursing care across the lifespan in the lab setting. This course is a laboratory course with a focus on transitioning from L.P.N. to R.N. assessment and application of the nursing process to all age groups and review of L.P.N. skills, introduction of beginning R.N. skills and safe medication administration in preparation for R.N. clinical rotations. This course is intended to complement content taught in NURS 142 . Officially accepted into the A.D.N. Bridge Program (370) and “C” or better in PSYC 201  , ENGL 101  , BIOL 213  , and BIOL 214 . Officially accepted into the A.D.N Bridge Program (370), unencumbered L.P.N license, and “C” or better in PSYC 201  , ENGL 101  , BIOL 213  , and BIOL 214 .To progress in the program, the student must maintain a grade of a “C” or better in program courses. Co-requisites: NURS 142 .
  
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    NURS 144 - Health Concepts Bridge


    Credit(s): 5
    Contact Hours: 9

    This course is designed for the Licensed Practical Nurse transitioning to Registered Nursing Practice. The didactic portion of this course will build on concepts introduced in Bridge to RN Practice I and II, and provide for further understanding of concepts within the domains of the individual, healthcare and nursing. Major emphasis on multiple concepts of Homeostasis and Regulation, Protection and Movement, Oxygenation and Hemostasis, Coping and Stress Tolerance, Attributes and Roles, Care Competency, and Health Care Delivery. The clinical component of this course is designed to assist students in the application and interpretation of individual, health care and nursing concepts in adult patients experiencing common health alteration in the acute care setting.  Officially accepted into the A.D.N. Bridge Program (370), “C” or better in BIOL 225 , COMM 103 , NURS 142 , NURS 143  and NURS 148 . Must hold an Unencumbered L.P.N. License. To progress in the program, the student must maintain a grade of a “C” or better in general education and program courses.
  
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    NURS 148 - Behavioral Health Concepts Bridge


    Credit(s): 5
    Contact Hours: 9

    This course is designed to provide instructional, clinical, and lab learning experiences in the provision of evidence-based nursing care to individuals experiencing psychiatric mental health disorders. The lecture portion of this course will emphasize the concepts of mood and affect, stress and coping, advocacy, safety, therapeutic communication and managing care. The clinical and lab components of this course are designed to assist students in integrating critical thinking and decision-making throughout the nursing process to improve the care of patients experiencing psychiatric mental health disorders. Officially accepted into the A.D.N Bridge Program (370), unencumbered L.P.N license, and “C” or better in PSYC 201  , ENGL 101  , BIOL 213  , and BIOL 214  . To progress in the program, the student must maintain a grade of a “C” or better in program courses” to the catalog description.
  
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    NURS 246 - Family Concepts Bridge


    Credit(s): 5
    Contact Hours: 9

    This combined lecture/clinical course is designed to further develop the concepts within the three domains of the profile, process, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on concepts of oxygenation, sexuality, reproduction, grief/loss, mood/affect, behaviors, development, family, health/wellness/illness, communication, caring interventions, managing care, safety, and advocacy. There is a focus on the family and significant others, identifying diverse cultural backgrounds, patterns of knowing and situational crises of family health. The clinical portion of this course will allow for application of concepts gained in lecture to meet the needs of the individual throughout childbearing, antepartum, labor and delivery, and postpartum periods. It will also provide the opportunity to apply concepts to the application of care of the neonate, child and adolescent. Both observational as well as hands on activities will be provided, additionally, community resources will be identified in various health care agencies. Upon completion, student should be able to provide safe nursing care to the family unit incorporating the concepts identified in this course. Officially accepted into the A.D.N. Bridge Program (370), “C” or better in BIOL 225  , COMM 103  , NURS 142  , NURS 143   and NURS 148  . Must hold an Unencumbered L.P.N. License. To progress in the program, the student must maintain a grade of a “C” or better in general education and program courses.
  
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    NURS 254 - Health Concepts II


    Credit(s): 5
    Contact Hours: 9

    The didactic portion of this course is designed to build upon concepts presented in NURS 134  . Emphasis is placed on the concepts of Homeostasis and Regulation, Sexuality and Reproduction, Protection and Movement, Nursing Attributes and Roles, Care Competency and Health Care Delivery. The clinical/lab/simulation component of this course is designed to assist beginning students in the application and interpretation of individual, healthcare and nursing concepts in adult patients experiencing common health alterations in the acute care setting. Officially accepted into ADN program and “C” or better in COMM 103  , BIOL 214  , BIOL 225   and NURS 139  .
  
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    NURS 256 - Family Nursing


    Credit(s): 6
    Contact Hours: 10

    This combined lecture/lab/clinical course is designed to further develop the concepts within the three domains of the profile, process, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on concepts of oxygenation, sexuality, reproduction, grief/loss, mood/affect, behaviors, development, family, health/wellness/illness, communication, caring interventions, managing care, safety, and advocacy. There is a focus on the family and significant others, identifying diverse cultural backgrounds, patterns of knowing and situational crises of family health. The clinical portion of this course will allow for application of concepts gained in lecture to meet the needs of the individual throughout childbearing, antepartum, labor and delivery, and postpartum periods. It will also provide the opportunity to apply concepts to the application of care of the neonate, child, and adolescent. Both observational as well as hands on activities will be provided, additionally, community resources will be identified in various health care agencies. Upon successful completion, students will be able to provide safe nursing care to the family unit incorporating the concepts identified in this course. Officially accepted into ADN program and “C” or better in COMM 103  , BIOL 214  , BIOL 225   and NURS 139  . To progress in the program, the student must maintain a grade of a “C” or better in general education and program courses.
  
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    NURS 265 - Complex Healthcare Concepts


    Credit(s): 6
    Contact Hours: 10

    This course is designed to assimilate the concepts within the three domains of the individual, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of fluid/electrolytes, metabolism, perfusion, mobility, stress/coping, violence, health/wellness/illness, professional behaviors, caring interventions, managing care, healthcare systems, and quality improvement. This combined theory and clinic course allows for theoretical application of concepts within the lab and clinical settings in providing safe, effective and competent care while demonstrating the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to provide quality, individualized, entry level nursing care to patient populations experiencing complex health issues. Admission to the Registered Nursing Program 370 or 372, “C” or better in BIOL 276  , NURS 144   and NURS 246   or “C” or better in BIOL 276  , NURS 254   and NURS 256  . To complete the degree requirement for this course you must maintain a grade of ‘C’ or better.
  
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    NURS 267 - RN Capstone


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 9

    This course provides students the opportunity to (a) synthesize previous knowledge and skills; (b) develop new knowledge and skills for the management of client care across the healthcare continuum in a dynamically changing healthcare environment; (c) reflect on their learning achievements throughout their nursing education; and (d) hone their mastery of nursing knowledge to adequately prepare for successful passage of the NCLEX-RN. Students will fully realize the 8 educational outcomes of the nursing program by participation in simulation, lab and clinical activities; as well as, through attending live seminars and development of an individualized remediation plan to prepare for the NCLEX-RN, based upon HESI Exit and specialty exam performance. Emphasis will be placed on the NCLEX-RN blueprint of professionals nursing concepts and competencies. Students will demonstrate appropriate knowledge of established professional nursing standards, guidelines, and competencies within the lab, simulation and clinical environments and incorporate same in the delivery of safe, effective, evidence-based, quality nursing care to clients across the life-span and the healthcare continuum. Admission to the Registered Nursing Program 370 or 372, “C” or better in BIOL 276  , NURS 144   and NURS 246   or “C” or better in BIOL 276  , NURS 254   and NURS 256  . To complete the degree requirement for this course you must maintain a grade of ‘C’ or better.” to the catalog description.

Office Information Systems

  
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    OIS 102 - Computer Keyboarding Skill Development


    Credit(s): 1
    Contact Hours: 2

    This course will allow students to develop keyboarding proficiency using proper techniques to touch type the alpha, numeric, and symbol keys as well as the numeric keypad. Emphasis is on learning proper
    techniques to improve both speed and accuracy.
  
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    OIS 108 - Document Processing


    Credit(s): 2
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course includes the study of business letters, complex reports, tabulations, and business forms. Emphasis will be on proper business formatting and mailability of finished documents. Prerequisite: Proven keyboarding speed of at least 30 wpm or permission of instructor.
  
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    OIS 117 - Records Management


    Credit(s): 2
    Contact Hours: 2

    This course covers the principles and practices of effective records management, retention, and disposal. Study will include alphabetic, numeric, and subject filing methods. An introduction to basic database concepts as needed for understanding automated records storage and retrieval methods will be included.
  
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    OIS 150 - Word Processing Applications


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    This course will cover both the beginning and the intermediate features of using Microsoft Word for document processing. Students will go beyond basic editing and formatting to cover such applications as mail merge, tables, styles, outlines, and more. Completion of assignments will require additional lab time.
  
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    OIS 170 - Electronic Medical Office Records


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course will introduce students to the electronic medical office record and the significant impact that it has on the work processes in the medical office setting. Students will develop an understanding of the electronic medical office record as a primary tool to support the work and workflow in the medical office.
  
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    OIS 191 - Business English & Proofreading


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    The student will study and apply correct grammar, punctuation, and word choice to a variety of business documents. Emphasis will be placed on proofreading and editing of correspondence on the computer and the efficient use of a variety of reference materials.
  
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    OIS 218 - Machine Transcription


    Credit(s): 2
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course develops language competencies and formatting knowledge required to produce malleable business documents from machine dictation. Prerequisites: OIS 150 , OIS 191 .
  
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    OIS 219 - Healthcare Documentation


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course develops the student’s ability to document a variety of healthcare reports by transcribing physicians’ dictation of medical progress reports, operative reports, letters, and other medical documents. The course incorporates the practice and application of healthcare documentation, spelling, grammar, punctuation, and capitalization according to AHDI standards. Prerequisites: OIS 218 , HLTH 118 .
  
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    OIS 220 - Medical Insurance Billing


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    Medical Insurance Billing is a foundations course designed to introduce students to concepts and procedures in the medical insurance billing process. The course develops medical office skills in processing governmental and commercial insurance claim forms. Students develop a basic foundation in diagnostic and procedural coding, as well as learning about legal and regulatory issues. Prerequisites: HLTH 118 , OIS 150 . Co-requisite: HLTH 119 .
  
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    OIS 230 - Medical Coding


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course is designed to expand upon knowledge acquired by students in OIS 220 . The course begins with diagnosis coding and builds on this foundation through additional instruction in current procedural terminology coding for evaluation and management, medicine, laboratory and pathology, as well as surgery coding for all body systems. The latest code sets, conventions, and guidelines are also introduced. Prerequisite: HLTH 119 , OIS 220 .
  
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    OIS 234 - Desktop Publishing & Design


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    This course will emphasize design techniques in the preparation of professional looking brochures, flyers, newsletters, etc. Topics covered will include the use of fonts; clip art, scanned, and digital cameras images; color selection; and introductory web page authoring. Prerequisite: CIS 101 , OIS 150  or permission of instructor.
  
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    OIS 250 - Advanced Word Processing Applications


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course will expand upon the basic skills covered in the beginning course and will include the more powerful features of the word processing software. Topics to be covered may include graphics, tables, styles, templates, macros, forms, master documents, collaboration tools, and introductory desktop publishing. Prerequisite: OIS 150 .
  
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    OIS 260 - Office Technology & Procedures


    Credit(s): 4
    Contact Hours: 4

    This capstone office training course is designed to integrate previously learned skills into activities simulating those found in an office environment. Students will prepare office documents, develop human relations skills, and practice time management and prioritizing. Heavy emphasis will be placed on group interaction and problem solving. Most of the class activities will require the use of the computer and other electronic technologies. As a final class assessment, all students will prepare an employment portfolio. Prerequisites: OIS 150 , OIS 191 .
  
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    OIS 270 - Health Information Management


    Credit(s): 3
    Contact Hours: 3

    This course will introduce students to the elements of health information management, including healthcare delivery systems, health information management professions, healthcare settings, patient records, numbering and filing systems, record storage, indexes, registers, health data collection, legal aspects, and coding and reimbursement issues. Prerequisite: OIS 170  or permission of instructor.
  
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    OIS 271 - OIS Internship Education


    Credit(s): 1
    Contact Hours: 1

    Students who have acquired the fundamental skill sets of their Office Information Systems education are given an opportunity to put their knowledge, skills, and abilities into practice through the OIS Internship Education course. The student may earn Office Information Systems elective credit by working in an office-related setting appropriate to their major course of study. Internship means work-for-credit only. Students must complete 40 hours per credit on the job. Prerequisite: Must be in final semester of program; cumulative GPA of 2.75 or higher. Must meet with advisor prior to registration. Internships may require that the student pass a criminal background check.
  
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    OIS 272 - OIS Internship Education


    Credit(s): 2
    Contact Hours: 2

    Students who have acquired the fundamental skill sets of their Office Information Systems education are given an opportunity to put their knowledge, skills, and abilities into practice through the OIS Internship Education course. The student may earn Office Information Systems elective credit by working in an office-related setting appropriate to their major course of study. Internship means work-for-credit only. Students must complete 40 hours per credit on the job. Prerequisite: Must be in final semester of program; cumulative GPA of 2.75 or higher. Must meet with advisor prior to registration. Internships may require that the student pass a criminal background check.
 

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